Ask Me About Spiders!

Hi, I'm Tobias and I know a lot about spiders. Do you need an ID? Maybe you want to know more about those loveable arachnids.
Submit a photo or ask a question- I'm here to help you out!

buggirl:

It’s HERE!!     LAUNCH DAY!!!!    I’m so excited to share my research goals with you!!

Now more than ever, with programs such as citizen scientists and Project Noah, is the general public becoming more crucial to the scientific process. 

If you could share this post ,and spare a donation to my scientific research, even if it is just $1-$5, you can make a huge difference in conservation and the future of science.

Give a dollar to spiders!!!    Thank you, Tumblr, for continued support and a place for me to share my passions with others.

-Andrea

aka buggirl

Hey, everyone!

If you can spare a dollar or more, please help out my pal Andrea with her research project. There’s still so much to learn about spiders!

I live in Boulder CO and found this guy above my fridge. Thought it might be a recluse. Any guesses?

Hi, Mike!

She’s not a brown recluse- there are no populations of any recluse spider (genus Loxosceles) in Colorado. She most closely resembles a long-legged sac spider, Cheiracanthium, but I can’t be certain of her species. She could be either C. inclusum or C. mildei.

Despite what you may have read, Cheiracanthium spiders do not possess a necrotic venom and are therefore not of medical significance.

Thanks for sharing!

Seen around construction site for 2 weeks in Northeast Massachusetts in july.

Hi, Jeff!

Your impromptu foreman there is a female fishing spider, Dolomedes tenebrosus, possibly Dolomedes scriptus. D. scriptus has more white on their abdomen, so since I can see a good portion of your spider’s, I’m going to stick with D. tenebrosus.

Fishing spiders are harmless and tend to be most abundant after rainfall. Also, the lady in your photo seems to be carrying either an eggsac or a recent meal.

Thank you for sharing!

Hi can you help identify this spider please, the location is saltney,Flintshire thanks [United Kingdom- I had to look it up]

Hi, Dan!

That gentleman is an orb weaver, possibly a Walnut Orb Weaver (Nuctenea umbratica), but I can’t see him well enough to be certain. Like all orb weavers, he’s completely harmless. This species is known to wander into homes sometimes- as appears to be the case here- but he can be easily relocated outdoors with a glass and a postcard or other sturdy bit of paper.

Thanks for sharing!

this little guy was on my bed and scared me because I thought it was a wasp at first glance. My location is Saskatchewan Canada 

Hi, Caitlin!
Your neat little pal is a ground spider (Gnaphosid) in the genus Sergiolus. They’re totally harmless and two best matches for species are S. columbianus and S. montanus. They’re so similar, in fact, that the only way to be certain of which species you have would be to examine them under a microscope.
Thank you for sharing!

this little guy was on my bed and scared me because I thought it was a wasp at first glance. My location is Saskatchewan Canada 

Hi, Caitlin!

Your neat little pal is a ground spider (Gnaphosid) in the genus Sergiolus. They’re totally harmless and two best matches for species are S. columbianus and S. montanus. They’re so similar, in fact, that the only way to be certain of which species you have would be to examine them under a microscope.

Thank you for sharing!

Found in my basement in Ashland, pa. 

Hi, Shannon!

Your spider does resemble a wolf spider, but it’s not impossible for her to be a funnel weaver, either. I can’t see any conspicuous spinnerets, though. And I can’t see the eyes well enough to be certain. The photo also isn’t clear enough for me to attempt to identify her to any genus level. If you could get a brighter, slightly closer photo, that would really help!

Sorry I couldn’t give you a solid ID, but thanks for sharing!

Hi, Ernest!

While you didn’t give me a location (and haven’t responded to my email as of my posting this), I can tell you that that’s not a spider in your photo. They’re still an arachnid, but are actually a tailless whipscorpion, order Amblypygi

These guys are harmless, though those modified pedipalps can look pretty intimidating. They don’t possess venom glands and neither sting nor bite. And I’m not nearly as familiar with them as I am spiders, so I’m afraid I can’t give you a more specific ID. 

Thank you for sharing such an interesting critter!

This is one of the few times I wished I lived in/near New York.  The American Museum of Natural History in New York is having and exhibit called Spiders Alive!  which is designed to teach people about spiders (and other arachnids) and dispel myths and general fear of the group:

http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/spiders-alive/about-the-exhibition

There’s an article on the exhibit here:

http://www.designntrend.com/articles/16302/20140704/natural-history-museum-gives-spiders-new-spin-with-live-exhibit.htm

My sister, a buddy of ours and I are trying to go to this! We’re working on planning a big NY trip. I’ve never been and I hope we can get money together and time off. :)

Thanks for sharing! 

Connecticut

Hi, Shawn!

That lovely lady is a fishing spider, Dolomedes tenebrosus. While they grow fairly large, they’re harmless. Usually these spiders are in greater abundance in late spring, after moderate to heavy rainfall. But it’s not odd to see them all the way through Septembre in most parts of the United States.

Thanks for sharing!

Hi! My name is Kristna, and I would like to know what type of spider this is, and whether or not it is poisonous. I found it on my apartment balcony, in San Diego, California. Thank you!

Hi, Kristna!

I’ve been so excited to share your photos! They’re gorgeous!

Your pal is a totally harmless, male jumping spider, Phidippus audax. Commonly called the Bold or Daring Jumping Spider, these guys are found all over the United States.

Here’s a better image match, from Bugguide.net. I thought he might be a Regal Jumping Spider (also harmless) but they’re not typically found that far west. The white bands on the carapace (cephalothorax/head) are kind of rare in this species, so I had to check out P. regius to make sure I had the right guy. :)

Thank you so much for sharing so many great angles!