Ask Me About Spiders!

Hi, I'm Tobias and I know a lot about spiders. Do you need an ID? Maybe you want to know more about those loveable arachnids.
Submit a photo or ask a question- I'm here to help you out!

This spider I saw in some bushes in Thai Mueang, Thailand. Do you know wich spider it is and if they are venomous?

Hey again, Gerrit!

Now this one looks a lot more like Nephila pilipes and I think I found a subspecies match- Nephila pilipes jalorensis. I hope this image search loads properly. If not, go ahead and just paste “nephila pilipes jalorensis” into an image search. There are several matches. I can’t find a good information website, though. Here they are listed on Wikipedia.

All known Nephila spiders are venomous, but that venom is not medically significant to humans. These guys aren’t prone to bite and will only do so when they feel threatened. 

Thanks for sharing! …And this is my 600th post!

Hi, I came across the web of this spider on the Perhentian Islands in Malaysia. Can you recognize this one? 

Hi, Gerrit!

I think this might be another Nephila antipodiana, the Batik Orb Weaver. She’s kind of in shadow, so I’m not 100% certain. She’s definitely a Nephila, though. Could also be Nephila pilipes. They’re better known in Australia, but there are sub species in other locations.  

Thanks for sharing!

I found this guy under some wood in western New York. Just shy of 2 inches I’d say, was very quick. Can you help me identify it? My guess was wolf spider but I’m not positive.

Hi, Scott! Good guess!
That little dude is in the genus Tigrosa and I’m almost positive he’s Tigrosa helluo. A few years ago he was cataloged as Hogna helluo, but it was determined and made official the summer of 2012 that helluo and four other species needed a separate genus. Thus, Tigrosa was created! 
Thank you for sharing! 

I found this guy under some wood in western New York. Just shy of 2 inches I’d say, was very quick. Can you help me identify it? My guess was wolf spider but I’m not positive.

Hi, Scott! Good guess!

That little dude is in the genus Tigrosa and I’m almost positive he’s Tigrosa helluo. A few years ago he was cataloged as Hogna helluo, but it was determined and made official the summer of 2012 that helluo and four other species needed a separate genus. Thus, Tigrosa was created! 

Thank you for sharing! 

I don’t know much about spiders, some people think this is a hobo spider. I live in Washington state so I guess it’s a possibility.  I thought maybe just a house spider. I know It’s not the best picture but if you could help out at all that would be great! 

Hey, Tina!

The people you’ve consulted are partially right- I’m pretty sure that leggy fellow is Eratigena atrica, the Giant House Spider. This species is a European import that’s made themselves quite at home in the Pacific Coast states. And, like their cousin the Hobo spider, they’re harmless.

Thank you for sharing!

Taking a spider break for a few hours. 

A tremendous “thank you for your patience” to everyone who’s been waiting all week (or longer!) for an ID!

Hi, Jaket!

I can’t tell from your photo whether or not she’s dead so I’ll just hope that she isn’t because I have no other way to contact you.

She’s not a widow spider but a harmless orb weaver in the genus Neoscona. I can’t see the other side of her abdomen, so I hesitate to give a species. These three are native so if you’ve seen or can send me a photo of the other side of her, one of us can figure out who she is. :) I am leaning a bit towards N. domiciliorum, though.

Thank you for sharing!

This spider is in my Kitchen. Double Paned window. I’m in Tyler, Texas. Is it a wolf spider?

Hi, Aaron!

I’m afraid the photo is a bit too blurry for me to be sure who you have there. Could be a wolf spider, could be a funnel weaver- the silk behind her looks like the outskirts of a funnel web. Those are my best two guesses and I could still be wrong. She- the palps don’t appear to have “bulbs” on the ends, so she’s female- could be from another family entirely. But she doesn’t resemble either a widow or brown recluse.

If you see her- or someone like her.. or any spider- again, please feel free to send me as many photos as you can! Thanks for sharing and sorry I couldn’t be of better assistance! 

Hi, 

Can you identify this spider for me? I saw it a couple years ago in a town called Jessore in Bangladesh. I have never before and never again seen this spider and the type of coloration. What is it? 

Hey, Shane!

That’s a huntsman spider- looks like Heteropoda. There aren’t any of that genus listed as occurring in Bangladesh, but India has several species of Heteropoda and spiders are good at traveling. Heteropoda venatoria's location is listed only as “pantropical”, so it’s not impossible that’s who your friend was. They’re totally harmless, despite being so big. :)

Thanks for sharing!

Taken in Thailand, at approx 1000m in the Phuping Palace Fern Garden, Chiang Mai. It was about 2.5 metres above my head. I estimate that it was easily as big as a large man’s hand, legs spanning from fingertip to wrist.

Hi, Peter! Sorry for the delay!

That beauty is a Golden Silk Orb Weaver, genus Nephila. The best match for species seems to be Nephila antipodiana. I checked the list of Nephilidae and it doesn’t mention any species as occurring in Thailand. Which is total bunk, but I think they just generalized it under things like “India to China”. There’s this site for Thailand Nephila, as well.

Totally harmless and really a sight to see in person. Thank you for sharing!

This is in response to attreeothechoosenone question:

This sounds like one of two issues. 

1) If the lens diaphragm (aperture) is  too open (low f-number), the part of the picture that will be in focus is very small.  Increasing the f-stop (making the aperture smaller) will increase the depth of field (making more things in focus).

2) If the aperture is too small (too large of an f-number), you will start having problems with diffraction from the small opening.  The diffraction makes things away from the center blurry, so you end up with a central area looking sharp, growing less sharp as you get to the edge of the picture.  There’s a good explanation of the diffraction issue (though maybe in too much detail) here http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/technical/diffraction.html

For most macro work, I generally shoot with a 105mm macro lens at f-stops between f11 and f16 which gets the best of both worlds (decent depth of field and not too much diffraction).

Also if you are not using a flash, you usually need to use a tripod (or some other camera support) as the short camera-to-subject distance amplifies any shaking/movement of the camera and makes the picture blurry.

Thanks, Cory!