Ask Me About Spiders!

Hi, I'm Tobias and I know a lot about spiders. Do you need an ID? Maybe you want to know more about those loveable arachnids.
Submit a photo or ask a question- I'm here to help you out!

This spider is in Southeast Wisconsin 

Hi, Matt!

I think I found a match for this pretty girl- Araneus nordmanni. I’m not 100% sure, since I can’t see her abdomen and the pattern there. But she has the right eyes, those bright red femurs and shoulders for the species. 

Thank you for sharing!

spiderask:

samcrosser:

spiderask:

samcrosser:

spiderask what kind of spider is this?!

Hi there! Where are you located? That usually helps me figure out which spider a person has.

They could be a funnel, hacklemesh or mesh web weaver. Maybe a ground spider or a ground sac spider. With a little more info, I can be more specific.

Thanks!

I’m in north eastern Ohio! The spider is living in my basement bathroom. I don’t want to harm it or mess with it if its not venomous.

Ah, thanks! Well I can assure you they’re not dangerously venomous. The only spider with medically significant venom in Ohio is the black widow, and your pal there is definitely not a Latrodectus. Also- not a mesh web weaver. I’ll take a closer look at your photo tonight and see if they look better on a big screen. :)

Okay, I think she (the palps look more pointed than full-on “boxing glove”) is a hacklemesh weaver. My best guess is Amaurobius ferox, though she could possibly be in the genus Callobius. What I can make out of the pattern on her abdomen (after bringing up the brightness on the photo) looks better suited to A. ferox.

Thanks for asking!

samcrosser:

spiderask:

samcrosser:

spiderask what kind of spider is this?!

Hi there! Where are you located? That usually helps me figure out which spider a person has.

They could be a funnel, hacklemesh or mesh web weaver. Maybe a ground spider or a ground sac spider. With a little more info, I can be more specific.

Thanks!

I’m in north eastern Ohio! The spider is living in my basement bathroom. I don’t want to harm it or mess with it if its not venomous.

Ah, thanks! Well I can assure you they’re not dangerously venomous. The only spider with medically significant venom in Ohio is the black widow, and your pal there is definitely not a Latrodectus. Also- not a mesh web weaver. I’ll take a closer look at your photo tonight and see if they look better on a big screen. :)

samcrosser:

spiderask what kind of spider is this?!

Hi there! Where are you located? That usually helps me figure out which spider a person has.

They could be a funnel, hacklemesh or mesh web weaver. Maybe a ground spider or a ground sac spider. With a little more info, I can be more specific.

Thanks!

shipwreckedsaydie:

spiderask I found this little critter the other day. I live in central texas. Any cool facts or ideas on what kinda spidey he is? ( his name is Jeremy )

Hi there!

That little guy/girl is am immature black widow. They could be either Latrodectus hesperus (Western Black Widow) or Latrodectus mactans (Southern Black Widow). The younger spiders of both species are very similar to each other. I like that they were just chilling near the street. :)

Thanks for asking!

Just a quick question, why do you say that all of the spiders you post are harmless? Is that really true? No disrespect I am honestly curious. Like every single post you use the word “harmless” and idk that doesn’t seem 100% truth to me…

The main reason I say “harmless” is because I’m lazy. :) What I mean when I say that is that the spider does not have a venom that can harm humans. They’re not medically significant. I got tired of typing both of those things out, so I just reverted to the simplest way possible to let the average person know that the spider they found can’t kill them with their venom. “Not medically significant” could also be confusing to some people, is another reason I don’t say it as often.

I in no way meant to imply that a person could jump right in and handle the spider with no risk of being bitten. I don’t recommend anyone try to handle spiders, not unless they’ve been reading about them and are familiar with the species they’ve found, at least. I’m lucky that no spider has seen me as a threat in the 12 1/2 years I’ve been picking them up.

So, while spider bites don’t happen with the frequency that various media (and people) report, that doesn’t mean spiders won’t bite. They do so when they feel threatened or cornered, or when females are protecting their egg sac. They can bite when trapped between clothing and skin. They always have a reason, though that reason might not be apparent to the person who was bitten.

Thank you for bringing that up- I was wondering when someone would call me out on my laziness. :)

Hi Tobias,

A friend of mine sent me a link to keys for dipterans (flies) and I noticed there were what looks like interesting references on northern spiders  as well.

Here’s the page link followed by the spider-related references:

Agriculture and Agri-Food Entomological Monographs

  • Various authors, 1987, The insects, spiders and mites of Cape Breton Highlands National Park, BRC Report 1, 302 (pdf)
  • Dondale, C.D. & Redner, J.H., 1990, The wolf spiders, nurseryweb spiders, and lynx spiders of Canada and Alaska: Araneae: Lycosidae, Pisauridae, and Oxyopidae, Insects and Arachnids of Canada Handbook Series, 17, 383 (pdf)
  • Dondale, C.D. & Redner, J.H., 1978, The crab spiders of Canada and Alaska: Araneae: Philodromidae and Thomisidae, Insects and Arachnids of Canada Handbook Series, 5, 255 (pdf)
  • Dondale, C.D. & Redner, J.H., 1982, The sac spiders of Canada and Alaska: Araneae: Clubionidae and Anyphaenidae, Insects and Arachnids of Canada Handbook Series, 9, 194 (pdf)
  • Platnick, N.I. & Dondale, C.D., 1991, The ground spiders of Canada and Alaska : Araneae: Gnaphosidae, Insects and Arachnids of Canada Handbook Series, 19, 297 (pdf)

Oh awesome! Thanks! I can’t say offhand if I’ve read these, but I’m going to check them out soon and see. Since they’re from the early 1990s and back, some info might have since been changed/revised, but I won’t know till I read and research.

Thanks again!

Six of the nine remaining spiders are orb weavers. I think half of those or more are Cross Spiders. :) I’ve already emailed the people that sent the photos, so I’ll post the rest at my leisure. …And probably get more photos in the meantime. G’night, all!

I live in lewisville texas. In a trailer community that’s somewhat hidden so I see alot of different insects and outside life. What kind of spider is this? It’s biggest one I seen so far

Hi, Ernesto!

That neat little critter (or not-so-little, since she’s the biggest you’ve seen) is a wolf spider. From what I can see, I think she’s Tigrosa aspersa. I know the image is small and when enlarged it gets blurry, but I’ve seen a lot of T. aspersa from Texas this past month, so I feel pretty good calling her one. :)

Thank you for sharing!

Found in my living room in central California.

Hi, Michael!

He’s a harmless false widow spider, Steatoda grossa. Little dude’s probably on the lookout for some female companionship. :)

Thanks for sharing!